Rants ‘n Raves by a Nuyorican Who Calls Herself Bennie

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Valparaiso, Chile (by Sergio Larrain, 1957)

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See on Scoop.itEverything and nothing to do with The digital world

“A good picture is born from a state of grace. Grace becomes manifest when one is freed from conventions, free as a child in his first discovery of reality. The game is then to organize the triangle.” – Sergio Larrain.

 

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Written by Benilda Pacheco Beretta

March 19, 2013 at 12:49 pm

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Editorial Photographers UK | 2013 – the year we lost sight of what photography can achieve

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This year’s announcement of the winners of two major competitions for photojournalists, World Press Photo and Pictures of the Year International, created more than the usual fire storm.

 

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See on www.epuk.org

Written by Benilda Pacheco Beretta

March 19, 2013 at 12:49 pm

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Future of Engagement Is The Social Curation

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What is Social Curation? Social curation involves aggregating, organizing and sharing content created by others to add con…

 

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Written by Benilda Pacheco Beretta

March 10, 2013 at 7:24 am

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Rennio Maifredi: If you knew me you would care | Le Journal de la Photographie

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If You Knew Me You Would Care is a collection of personal stories and portraits that come together to tell a powerful tale not only of survival, but also of life regained and the strength of the human spirit.

Published by powerHouse Books New York, the stories in If You Knew Me You Would Care are from women who have survived the most horrific experiences that come as a result of conflict, violence, and poverty in places such as war-torn Afghanistan, the Democratic Republic of Congo, Rwanda, and Bosnia and Herzegovina.

 

See on lejournaldelaphotographie.com

Written by Benilda Pacheco Beretta

March 7, 2013 at 10:00 am

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Video Storytelling Made Easy with the New Google Story Builder

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Collaboration has gone Google. Create a story and then share your video.

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Written by Benilda Pacheco Beretta

March 7, 2013 at 9:59 am

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On the production line in the 20s and 30s: Forgotten photographs chart the progress of industry at castings company in Derby

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See on Scoop.itEverything and nothing to do with The digital world

They sat in boxes for eight years, but now pictures of life at one of Britain’s most significant industrial firms in the Twenties and Thirties are to go on show for the first time.

Photographs showing the workers of the Leys Malleable Castings Company in Derby were discovered by researchers in the city’s Local Studies Library.

Leys, which made castings for cars, opened in Derby in 1874 and became the largest malleable iron foundry in Europe.

See on www.dailymail.co.uk

Written by Benilda Pacheco Beretta

March 7, 2013 at 9:59 am

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Mario Giacomelli – The Black is Waiting for the White

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For the selection of photographs that I have curated to illustrate this book, I have to begin with one of Ciacomelli’s more iconic and surrealist photograph from his series Scanno(1959). I also have to admit that seeing this photograph for the first time a long time ago was a very startling experience for me. My very first impression was that the MoMA (NYC) had made a very big mistake including this photograph in an exhibition. My sensibilities were that such that a photograph should look “natural”, that if there were any retouching, it should not be noticeable to the viewer. And this graphic photograph was in direct contradiction to everything I thought a photograph should look like, as I felt it was very apparent to even the most naive viewer, that it had been heavily manipulated. As you might suspect, I was caught up in the physicality of a photograph, not the symbolism or poetic intent of the image’s content. Interestingly, this single photograph also had the most impact on me as Giacomelli’s name and image were as though seared permanently on my memory.

See on thephotobook.wordpress.com

Written by Benilda Pacheco Beretta

March 7, 2013 at 9:58 am

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